Terror(ism) in Literature: ‘The Man Who Was Thursday’: A Review

Authors

  • Gülnur Demirci Karadeniz Technical University

Abstract

Authors either use terror as a topic or theme in order to justify the acts of the artist as revolutionist or as “terror-ist.”  This paper aims to indicate the relation between terror as an essential mode in art and literature in the form of textuality with reference to The Man Who Was Thursday. Gilbert Keith Chesterton’s enigmatic novel, with its humorous tone and fantastic elements contending crucial arguments, stresses its paradoxical situation regarding terror(ism) in the subtitle: A Nightmare. Yet, the optimistic end and the function of dream to reveal the mythical essence of terror(ism) ironizes the ‘nightmare.’

References

Burke, Edmund. A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful. Ed. Adam Phillips. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990.
Chesterton, G. K. The Man Who Was Thursday a Nightmare. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Christian Classics Ethereal Library, 1908.
Chesterton, G. K. The G.K. Chesterton Collection II. Catholic Way Publishing, 1901.
Ghaderi, Behzad. “The Sublime and the Grotesque in Romantic Drama.” Language Forum, Vol. 27, No. 1-2. New Delhi, 2001.
Houen, Alex. Terror(ism) and Modern Literature, from Joseph Conrad to Ciaran Carson. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002
Looney, Mark Einer. “Representing Terror(ism) Aesthetic Reflection and Political Action in Contemporary German Novels (Goetz, Klein, Tellkamp).” Diss. Vanderbilt University, 2010.
Martin, Elaine. “The Global Phenomenon of "Humanizing" Terror(ism) in Literature and Cinema.” Comparative Literature and Culture. Vol. 9, Issue 1. Purdue University Press, 2007.
Mellor, Anne. “English Romantic Irony.” Keats-Shelley Journal. Keats-Shelley Association of America, 1982. JSTOR.
Nietzsche, Friedrich. The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music. Tr. Ian Johnston. Richer Resources Publications, 2012.
Thomas Perry Thornton. "Terror as a Weapon of Political Agitation." Internal War: Problems and Approaches. Ed. Harry Eckstein. Free Press, 1964

Published

2015-06-30

How to Cite

Demirci, G. (2015). Terror(ism) in Literature: ‘The Man Who Was Thursday’: A Review. Journal of Narrative and Language Studies, 3(4). Retrieved from http://nalans.com/index.php/nalans/article/view/14

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